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Rapeseed Oil

Alternate Names

Canola Oil, Fully Hydrogenated Rapeseed Oil, Superglycerinated Rapeseed Oil, Low Erucic Acid Rapeseed Oil, Hydrogenated Rapeseed Oil, Partially Hydrogenated Rapeseed Oil, Oilseed Rape

Description

Rapeseed is the traditional name for the group of oilseed crops in the Brassicaceae family (brightly yellow flowering member of the mustard family). The plants naturally contains a high level of erucic acid, a mildly toxic and bitter fatty acid. Due to the health concerns associated with the acid, a lower acid-containing variety was developed which is called Canola. It is tasteless which makes it a good choice for cooking.

Rapeseed Oil - Quick Stats
Names

Canola Oil, Fully Hydrogenated Rapeseed Oil, Superglycerinated Rapeseed Oil, Low Erucic Acid Rapeseed Oil, Hydrogenated Rapeseed Oil, Partially Hydrogenated Rapeseed Oil, Oilseed Rape

Allergy Information

Partially Hydrogenated Oil

Uses

Emulsifier, Stabilizer, Thickener, Emulsifier

Additional Information

The name Canola came from the abbreviation: "Can.O.,L-A" (Canadian Oilseed, Low-Acid) which was used by the Canadian government during its experimental stages. Also referred to as: Rapa, Rappi Rapaseed. Canola is a hybrid with less erucic acid. The FDA indicates that rapeseed oil may not be used in infant formula. Canola has been heavily marketed as a healthy oil, one low in saturated fat and high in monounsaturated fat ("the good fat") and is sometimes referred to as an alternative to olive oil. Some of the concerns surrounding Canola include: (1) it goes through intensive processing and refining which involves solvents and chemicals (including hexane) for extracting, bleaching and deodorizing (2) most (approx 93%) of canola grown in the US is genetically modified to withstand certain herbicides and agricultural chemicals (3) while Canola is bred to be lower in erucic acid, it still contains a percentage of the acid (4) it is a relatively new oil from the 1970's of which very few human studies have been conducted on its safety



Found In

cooking oil, fried foods, salad oil, margarine, cake mix, peanut butter, packaged foods, restaurant food

Possible Health Effects

Animal studies indicate rapeseed oil may cause skin eruptions and may affect the liver and kidneys.

Allergy Information

Unknown

In The News

May 2, 2012: Are Olive Oil and Canola Oil Interchangeable? by Ari LaVaux. June 2, 2009: Canola Oil is Another Victory of Food Technology over Common Sense by Barbara L. Minton. December 6, 2006: Choosing Canola Oil? by Andrew Weil, M.D.

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Watch the Video: How It's Made - Canola Oil
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Online Resources/Related

Print Resources



Copyright September 12, 2010 Be Food Smart, Updated May 10, 2012




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